butte


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ride (someone's) butt

To frequently or constantly harass, nag, or upbraid someone to do, accomplish, or complete something. The boss is riding everyone's butt to get the project finished by next week. Quit riding my butt, I'll get it done eventually!
See also: butt, ride

butt (up) against (someone or something)

1. To be positioned physically next to someone or something. The table is just a little too long—it butts up against the wall over here. Our neighbor's new addition butts against our bushes, unfortunately.
2. To crash into someone or something. My daughter got hurt when another girl on the soccer field butted against her. My car is in the shop because I butted up against a barricade on the highway.
See also: butt

butt in

To interrupt someone or something. I'm sorry to butt in, but I have some information that might help. Mom is always using the phone in her office to butt in on my conversations!
See also: butt

butt into (something)

To interrupt something (which is stated after "into"). I'm sorry to butt into your discussion, but I have some information that might help. Mom is always using the phone in her office to butt into my conversations!
See also: butt

butt out

1. slang An instruction, usually said in frustration, for someone to stop intruding in one's business or conversation. Butt out, sis—I don't need your opinion on everything I do!
2. slang To leave a place hastily. We butted out of the party when we heard sirens approaching.
See also: butt, out

have a corncob up (one's) butt

1. vulgar slang To be very stiff, rigid, or inflexible in one's posture or demeanor. Primarily heard in US. The guy trundled around the stage so gracelessly and awkwardly, as if he had a corncob up his butt. You'd think she has a corncob up her butt from the way she sits in class.
2. vulgar slang To be very rigid or inflexible in one's opinions or beliefs. Primarily heard in US. My grandfather had a real corncob up his butt when it came to people living together or having children before marriage.
3. vulgar slang To be irritable, unfriendly, or humorless. Primarily heard in US. Geez, it was just a joke—you must have a corncob up your butt or something. I wouldn't mess around with Mr. Daniels, he's got a corncob up his butt today.
See also: butt, corncob, have, up

have a poker up (one's) butt

1. vulgar slang To be very stiff, rigid, or inflexible in one's posture or demeanor. The guy trundled around the stage so gracelessly and awkwardly, as if he had a poker up his butt. You'd think she has a poker up her butt from the way she sits in class.
2. vulgar slang To be very rigid or inflexible in one's opinions or beliefs. My grandfather had a real poker up his butt when it came to people living together or having children before marriage.
3. vulgar slang To be irritable, unfriendly, or humorless. Geez, it was just a joke—you must have a poker up your butt or something. I wouldn't mess around with Mr. Daniels, he's got a poker up his butt today.
See also: butt, have, poker, up

butt in (on someone or something)

to interrupt someone or something. Pardon me for butting in on your conversation, but this is important. John butted in on Tom and Jane to tell them that the mail had come.
See also: butt

butt out

to exit [as abruptly as one has intruded]. (Compare this with butt in (on someone or something). Usually a command.) Butt out! Leave me alone! Please butt out of my life!
See also: butt, out

butt in

Interfere, interrupt, intrude. For example, Mom is always butting in on our conversations, or It's against the law for employers to butt in on personal matters. This term alludes to the thrusting of an animal with its horns. [Slang; 1890s]
See also: butt

butt in

v.
To intrude upon or interrupt someone or something: You're always butting in my conversations, and I wish you'd stop. I can't believe that you butted in on that meeting! We were having a good talk until you butt in.
See also: butt

butt out

v. Slang
1. To stop interfering or meddling in someone's affairs. Often used as a command: Butt out!—This conversation is none of your business! I wish you'd butt out when I'm trying to talk to my boss.
2. To leave some place hastily; depart: If anyone sees us, let's butt out of the room. The thieves stole my bag and butted out.
See also: butt, out
References in periodicals archive ?
Dense brush covers the hillside letter, a lesser known feature to Skinner Butte than the big exposed "O" also on the south slope.
Montana Tech professor John Ray leveled considerable reproach, condemning EPA for a lack of transparency, a lack of community involvement and what he calls EPA's failure to address environmental justice in Butte.
Bert Robins, SeaCast vice president and co-owner said, "We are thrilled to have our Butte facility team up with GE Aviation.
For instance, when the nurse is asking about their pain, we can't tell if it was a male nurse or a female nurse," Butte says, adding that variation could change the answer from the patient.
A well-known Crested Butte resident, John Norton, wrote the Crested Butte News, saying, "Forest Service to Crested Butte: 'Drop Dead.
Norm Nielsen, owner of Chico Electric, and a Butte College alumnus, was the solar installation vendor and said it took three months to complete.
Discussion--The Turtle Butte Assemblage has a diverse microfauna, particularly rodents and lagomorphs, typical of the Arikareean, as those orders were diversifying during that time.
Saddleback Butte State Park is at Avenue J and 170th Street East.
Our relationship with Bear Butte predates Meade County.
Readers will discover the fascinating and multifaceted story of Crested Butte which originally attracted coal miners, along with many great details of that history, as well as all of the dangers the area's business encountered.
George Mulcaire-Jones, president and founder of Maternal Life International of Butte, Montana, from an August 11-17, 2002 National Catholic Register article.
Butte had more than one Grand Marshal this year as stalwarts in the Irish Families and Traditions took the lead in the way of the Maloney family.
Having done a little research, I've got something of a fix on it, although I can't help thinking that the difference between a mesa and a butte is something I'll be eternally fated to repress and be unable to remember, like the difference between a stalagmite and a stalactite and a schlemiel and a schlamazel.
The town of Butte in Montana was so gaelic, Irish history was taught there until the 1940s.