the bottom line

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the bottom line

1. Literally, the final figure on a statement showing a person or company's total profit or loss. What is the bottom line for this quarter?
2. By extension, the most important aspect of something. You have all made compelling arguments, but the bottom line is that we need a viable, cost-effective solution, and I still don't think we've found one yet.
3. Profit or the desire for profit as an ultimate goal. These large corporations are only driven by the bottom line. They couldn't care less whether their product is durable.
See also: bottom, line

bottom line

 
1. Lit. the last figure on a financial profit-and-loss statement, or on a bill. What's the bottom line? How much do I owe you? Don't tell me all those figures! Just tell me the bottom line.
2. Fig. the result; the final outcome. I know about all the problems, but what is the bottom line? What will happen? The bottom line is that you have to go to the meeting because no one else can.
See also: bottom, line

bottom line

The ultimate result, the upshot; also, the main point or crucial factor. For example, The bottom line is that the chairman wants to dictate all of the board's decisions, or Whether or not he obeyed the law is the bottom line. This is an accounting term that refers to the earnings figures that appear on the bottom (last) line of a statement. It began to be transferred to other contexts in the mid-1900s.
See also: bottom, line

the bottom line

COMMON In a discussion or argument, the bottom line is the most important and basic fact about what you are discussing. The bottom line is that the great majority of our kids are physically unfit. The bottom line is he's a real nice guy and I don't want to hurt him. Note: You can use bottom-line before a noun. This is a very good story, and that is the bottom-line criterion for any novel. Note: This expression refers to the last line in a set of accounts, which states how much money has been made.
See also: bottom, line

the bottom line

the final reality; the important conclusion.
Literally, the bottom line is the final total in an account or balance sheet.
1991 Sun The bottom line is that we would rather have Venables and Sugar than Gazza, Maxwell and Scholar.
See also: bottom, line

the ˌbottom ˈline

(informal) the important conclusion, judgement, or result: We’ve had some success this year, but the bottom line is that the business is still losing money.
See also: bottom, line

the bottom line

1. n. the grand total; the final figure on a balance sheet. (Securities markets.) The company’s bottom line is in bad shape.
2. n. the result; the nitty-gritty; the score. The bottom line is that you really don’t care.
See also: bottom, line
References in periodicals archive ?
Topics ranged from "Using StaffSmart to Assist with Merger Planning" and "Making Distributed Scheduling Work" to insight into Demos Solutions' product direction and vision for extending the bottom line benefits financial institutions are gaining from using StaffSmart in retail operations to their back office and sales operations.
Financial services organizations around the globe can look to these organizations as models for their approach to using Demos Solutions' StaffSmart to improve bottom line results," concluded Demos.
Hrncir, eRoomSystem Technologies' vice president of business affairs, said hotels' bottom lines and guest satisfaction are the bottom line for all of eRoomSystem's computer-based in-room service centers.
Management's strategies of partnering with physicians through contracting vehicles as opposed to employing physicians, not acquiring or merging with other hospitals, and not establishing or buying into a provider-sponsored managed care organization, appear to have been sound and have led to solid historic bottom lines.
And since in the final analysis prices have more impact on steel companies' bottom lines than any other factor this is a factor for shareholders to bear in mind", said Roger Phillips.
Our goal is to allow customers to take full advantage of the Web as a business platform -- to improve their bottom lines through both cost reduction, and most importantly, increase revenues," said Zack Rinat, NetDynamics president and CEO.
30, 1995--As corporate profits turn down, leading companies are looking at marketing cost analysis to lift their bottom lines, says Jonathan B.