Big Dig


Also found in: Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Big Dig

n. the extensive, underground interstate highway (and commuter route) tunneled under Boston, MA. The Big Dig has about 300 water leaks raining down inside.
See also: big, dig
References in periodicals archive ?
That happened when I was at Harvard Pilgrim," Baker said, noting he left the Big Dig mess behind in 1998 when he exited his job as the top finance official for Gov.
Finally, some good news on the Big Dig - Alan Hughes, Aigburth
In fact, the BIG DIG is an extension of the successful Hometown Trees(TM) program, which was launched in 1992 by IGA, Louisiana-Pacific and Coca-Cola.
Murray also said, "If you look up crisis in the dictionary, you'll find a picture of Baker and a narrative on the Big Dig financing scheme which Baker signed off on as Administration and Finance secretary.
DEBATE: Cllrs Millea, far left, and Anderson disagree about the pounds 73m Big Dig
Environmental organizations involved in the Big Dig effort across the country include Forest ReLeaf in St.
While 6 in 10 state residents consider the Big Dig a major improvement or something of an improvement in traffic flow, over half (52.
Baker appears ready to make taxes and the economy central issues in his campaign, while Democrats are poised to tag him with lingering transportation finance problems that have plagued the state because of Big Dig debt.
Organisers of the big dig at the site of the medieval village of East Marton, in Middlesbrough, are hoping to identify buildings, including the possible birthplace of Captain Cook.
Irritated that the nation's biggest public works project has made downtown traffic as slow as fudge sauce, Boston motorists can cool down by snacking on a few scoops of the Big Dig.
The entire northbound and southbound tunnel sections of the Big Dig have been modeled (see www.
The Big Dig, Despite all the horror stories, it rates as the most complex and brilliant engineering project in Massachusetts history and has turned Boston from a dingy, traffic-clogged nightmare into a modern city with a bright future.
What they pathetically call the Big Dig has been badly organised and managed.
PERHAPS the main surprise from the online survey we have conducted into the effects of the Big Dig - the results of which we reveal today on Pages 6-7 - is that only 80% of respondents believe business has suffered as a result of the ongoing roadworks nightmare.