baptism

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Related to Baptisms: baptized

baptism by fire

1. The first time a soldier enters combat. Taken from a phrase that originates from the Bible, in Matthew 3:11. As they marched onto the battlefield, you could see all of the uniformed boys become men as they experienced baptism by fire.
2. A difficult ordeal that one has to undergo through immersion and without preparation. One week into her new job, Mary felt like she was undergoing a baptism by fire when she was suddenly put in charge of the company's largest account.
See also: baptism, fire

baptism of fire

1. The first time a soldier enters combat. Taken from a phrase that originates from the Bible, in Matthew 3:11. As they marched onto the battlefield, you could see all of the uniformed boys become men as they experienced baptism of fire.
2. A difficult ordeal that one has to undergo through immersion and without preparation. One week into her new job, Mary felt like she was undergoing a baptism of fire when she was suddenly put in charge of the company's largest account.
See also: baptism, fire, of

baptism of fire

Fig. a first experience of something, usually something difficult or unpleasant. My son's just had his first visit to the dentist. He stood up to this baptism of fire very well. Mary's had her baptism of fire as a teacher. She was assigned to the worst class in the school.
See also: baptism, fire, of

a baptism by/of fire

a very difficult first experience of something I was given a million-dollar project to manage in my first month. It was a real baptism by fire.
See also: baptism, fire

baptism of fire

A severe ordeal or test, especially an initial one, as in This audition would be Robert's baptism of fire. This term transfers the original religious rite of baptism, whereby holiness is imparted, to various kinds of ordeal. At first it signified the death of martyrs at the stake, and in 19th-century France it was used for a soldier's first experience of combat. Currently it is used more loosely for any difficult first encounter.
See also: baptism, fire, of
References in periodicals archive ?
9) A "thin description" would look only at the surface level of the event of a baptism of the Spirit as it might occur in either community.
22) Strong, therefore, defines Christian baptism specifically as "the immersion of a believer in water, in token of his previous entrance into the communion of Christ's death and resurrection--or, in other words, in token of his regeneration through union with Christ.
For families only" baptisms in the afternoon deprive parishioners of the grace of being witnesses to the joy of baptism.
Baptism in the Early Church: History, Theology, and Liturgy in the First Five Centuries.
Infant Baptism in Reformation Geneva: The Shaping of a Community, 1536-1564.
However I feel obliged to tell you that this is not the first time churches in the area have performed full water immersion baptisms outdoors.
In 2006, 36 per cent of the Presbyterian congregations in the country (331 of 932 congregations reporting) did no baptisms at all; an almost 50 per cent increase from the 229 congregations who in 1992 did not celebrate any baptisms (23 per cent of 984 congregations reporting).
The decline in baptisms mirrors a long-term fall in church attendance overall.
A total of 20 people were welcomed into the Christian faith at the baptisms in a large water tank in the centre of York.
While it may be true that "infant Baptism requires a post-baptismal catechumenate" (Catechism #1231), does the absence of this assurance, which even in the best of cases can not be proven, justify placing in jeopardy the immediate fate of an innocent child's soul?
Spierling, Infant Baptism in Reformation Geneva: The Shaping of a Community, 1536-1564.
Given the paucity of mission records, specifically registers of baptisms and burials, there is no evidence for demographic patterns in the missions.
The United Church and the Anglican, Lutheran, Presbyterian and Roman Catholic churches in Canada have agreed to recognize each other's baptisms.
A LEADING priest has slammed Irish parents for giving their new-born babies boozy baptisms.
When Adrian Lucero asked North Hills resident Lisa Vargas, 25, to marry him, there was no question she would buy her dress at the San Fernando Mall, where she had shopped for years for everything from proms to baptisms and quinceaneras - the elaborate coming-out parties thrown to mark young Latinas' 15th birthdays.