bach

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bach (or batch) (it)

to live alone like a bachelor. I tried to bach it for a while, but I got too lonely. I didn't want to batch, but I had to.

ba(t)ch (it)

(bætʃ...)
tv. & in. to live alone like a bachelor. I tried to bach it for a while, but I got too lonely.
See also: batch

bach it

verb
See also: bach

bach

verb

bach it

To bach.
See also: bach
References in periodicals archive ?
Bach's Evangelist, Johann Heinrich Michel' which uses the music Bach composed for Michel (who was also his principal copyist) as a means of establishing a profile of the singer's voice and how Bach used him as a soloist.
A true son of the age of reason who missed experiencing only the first and last decades of the eighteenth century, Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714-1788) belongs among the very few among his contemporaries who consciously and quite regularly demonstrated clear historical awareness regarding the music of their own time as well as that of earlier periods.
Es folgt eine Betrachtung zu "Paul Klee, Johann Sebastian Bach und Pierre Boulez" von Wolfgang Kersten.
This claim (2:194) sounds unnecessarily broad on the face of it, but even more so if one knows that this comment overlooks a recent book that does just that, regardless of whether or not one agrees with its conclusions (Jerome Carrington, Trills in the Bach Cello Suites: a Handbook for Performers [Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2009]).
Engaging Bach is well written and easy to read, with clearly-fashioned arguments.
By taking advantage of the rare opportunity to present a complete set of sources, this edition enables one to engage a typical Bach church cantata from several different perspectives.
While several recent editions have emerged in response to dilemmas found in editions of the major choral works in the Neue Bach-Ausgabe, and thus resolving some long-standing textual issues (discussed in my review of other Bach editions in Notes 63, no.
Bach and the Musical Sublime" concentrates on Bach's stylistic achievement of sublimity.
John Passion within the surviving manuscript score and performing parts--one of the greatest accomplishments of Bach scholarship in the preceding century.
Obviously any guide to Bach research will be rendered obsolete in time, and new bibliographical materials and findings have appeared that are too recent to have made their way into this publication.
Robert Marshall contributes two essays on the sources of the B Minor Mass, which together constitute a well-balanced introduction to the methods of current Bach scholarship and the problems inherent in the autograph score.
Philip Ambrose's name as the translator of the Texte zu den Kirchenkantaten von Johann Sebastian Bach (Neuhausen-Stuttgart: Hanssler, 1984) seems a rather glaring oversight, as does the complete omission under "Thematic Indexes" of the previously mentioned Bach Compendium.
In Johann Sebastian Bachs Notenbibliothek Beisswenger effectively reconstructs Bach's collection and ably traces its history.
Does the "scholarly-critical" editor give what Bach probably intended, or a literal, "diplomatic" transcription?