attitude

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cop an attitude

Sl. to take a negative or opposite attitude about something. My teenage son copped an attitude when I asked why he seemed to be sneaking around.
See also: attitude, cop

devil-may-care attitude

 and devil-may-care manner
a very casual attitude; a worry-free or carefree attitude. You must get rid of your devil-may-care attitude if you want to succeed. She acts so thoughtless—with her devil-may-care manner.
See also: attitude

have a bad attitude

to have a negative outlook on things; to be uncooperative. Perry has a bad attitude and has nothing positive to contribute to the conversation.
See also: attitude, bad, have

wait-and-see attitude

Fig. a skeptical attitude; an uncertain attitude in which someone will just wait to see what happens before reacting. John thought that Mary couldn't do it, but he took a wait-and-see attitude. His wait-and-see attitude seemed to indicate that he didn't really care what happened.
See also: attitude

attitude-adjuster

n. a police officer’s nightstick; any club. Andy had a black attitude-adjuster hanging from his belt, and I wasn’t going to argue with him.

cop an attitude

tv. to take a negative or opposite attitude about something. (see also tude.) I think you’re copping an attitude. Not advised, dude. Not advised.
See also: attitude, cop

pull an attitude

tv. to be haughty; to put on airs. Don’t pull an attitude with me, chum!
See also: attitude, pull
References in classic literature ?
So I faced round quickly, and took up a position in the prow, where I leant with careless grace upon the hitcher, in an attitude suggestive of agility and strength.
This young lady loves you with an H,' the King said, introducing Alice in the hope of turning off the Messenger's attention from himself--but it was no use--the Anglo-Saxon attitudes only got more extraordinary every moment, while the great eyes rolled wildly from side to side.
It is only the men of her kind who war upon us, and I have ever thought that their attitude toward us is but the reflection of ours toward them.
Of all youth's passions and pleasures, this is the most common and least alloyed; and every flash of Alan's black eyes; every aspect of his curly head; every graceful reach, every easy, stand-off attitude of waiting; ay, and down to his shirt-sleeves and wrist-links, were seen by John through a luxurious glory.
While within the influence of the lingering sunbeams, her attitude seemed indicative of joy -- but sorrow deformed it as she passed within the shade.
Anna Mikhaylovna indicated by her attitude her consciousness of the pathetic importance of these last moments of meeting between the father and son.
This indifferent, if not hostile, attitude on William's part made it impossible to break off without animosity, largely and completely.
Von Horn had attempted to sound the girl that he might, if possible, discover her attitude toward the work in which her father and he were engaged.
Norman of Torn could scarce repress a smile at this clever ruse of the old priest, and, assuming a similar attitude, he replied in French:
You are adopting an attitude, sir," he said, "which, however much I may admire it from one point of view, seems to me scarcely to take into account the facts of the situation.
When he paused to contemplate the attitude of the police toward himself and his fellows, he believed that they were the only men in the city who had no rights.
His attitude had in it a suggestion of abstraction, like that of a sleepwalker.
Something in the attitude made the intruders halt when they had barely passed the threshold.
Its attitude is summed up in the words of the Muses to the writer of the "Theogony": `We can tell many a feigned tale to look like truth, but we can, when we will, utter the truth' ("Theogony"
A man of the present period, in Sir Patrick's position, would have struck an attitude of (what is called) chivalrous respect; and would have addressed Anne in a tone of ready-made sympathy, which it was simply impossible for a stranger really to feel.
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