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Attic salt

A shrewd, cutting, or subtle humor or wit. Also referred to as "Attic wit. Marianne was known to pepper her conversation with a bit of Attic salt, so she was quite popular at dinner parties.
See also: attic, salt

Attic wit

A shrewd, cutting, or subtle humor or wit. Also referred to as "Attic salt. He lays on the Attic wit a bit too often for my taste; I can never tell when he's being serious.
See also: attic, wit

have toys in the attic

To be crazy; to act, think, or behave in an eccentric, foolish, or nonsensical manner. Tommy must have toys in the attic if he thinks he can convince our mother to let him get a tattoo for his birthday. There's an old lady who stands on the corner yelling at strangers all day. I think she might have toys in the attic.
See also: attic, have, toy


n. the head, thought of as the location of one’s intellect. She’s just got nothing in the attic. That’s what’s wrong with her.
References in periodicals archive ?
But you'll get more bang for your buck by starting in the attic and basement/crawlspace.
PEOPLE in Coventry have pounds 116 million of buried treasure in their attic - and it's losing them pounds 7.
The JoistMate attic safety platform secures between either 16-inch oc (on center) or 24-inch oc joist spacings to form a solid platform upon which builders, technicians, exterminators and others can traverse wooden attic joists safely.
The reductions in ceiling heat flows from the heated conditioned space to the attic ranged from an average value of 13% for attics with R-l 1 (1.
Out-of-this world goodies include an alien figurine, keyring, cup, Aliens In The Attic sticker set and Aliens In The Attic bag.
It will realistically change the way we use our attics and crawl spaces for storage.
Sunlight Corp, announces the launch of its new product - the Solar Powered Attic Fan; an easy to install fan that is proven to save money when installed on existing homes as well as new construction.
Attics, unfinished basements and crawlspaces offer some of the easiest and most effective places to add insulation in an existing home.
To meet the Department of Energy recommendation for an R-value of up to 60 for attics, Owens Corning advises attics have about 19 inches of fiberglass batt insulation or 22 inches of blown insulation.
It commonly inhabits dark spaces, woodpiles, and cool areas in attics and storage sheds.
Sixty million American homes are estimated to have under-insulated attics.
The easiest, most cost-effective places to add insulation include attics, basement walls, and floors above unheated spaces like vented crawl spaces and garages.
With oil prices flirting with $100 a barrel, the 60 million American homes that are estimated to have under-insulated attics not only face increased energy costs of up to nearly 47.
Rodent droppings in undisturbed areas such as pantries, attics, garages, under baseboards and along walls
NAIMA advises that many homeowners may need to add between an R-19 and R-30 insulation to their attics in order to qualify for the tax credit and increase their comfort and savings.