Athanasian wench

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Athanasian wench

obsolete A derogatory term for a lascivious woman who readily has sex with any man who asks for it. Taken from the Athanasian Creed, an early Christian statement of belief from at least the 6th century, the opening words of which are quicunque vult , or "whosoever wishes." Sir, how dare you. I am not one of your Athanasian wenches, ready to indulge your lust at a moment's notice!
References in periodicals archive ?
31) The final straw, not surprisingly, was the Athanasian Creed.
The Athanasian Principle in Williams's Use of Images.
The Fathers of the Church would hardly dispute a fundamental article of Christian belief which, with scriptural authority, is part of the Athanasian creed.
The Council of Nicaea in 325, the Council of Constantinople in 381, the Athanasian Creed in the sixth century, even Pope Paul VI's "Credo of the People of God," published as late as 1968, and multiple others all attempted at different times, in the face of different questions, to reformulate the fundamentals in ways that could be understood by people at that time.
12) Pelikan summarizes the importance of belief in the Trinity in the Middle Ages: "After affirming that `whoever wants to be saved, it is necessary above all that he hold the catholic faith,' the Athanasian Creed had gone on to specify the two cardinal dogmas that formed the main content of that faith.
I think that even if the creeds from the so-called Apostles to the so-called Athanasian were swept into oblivion; and even if the human race should arrive at the conclusion that, whether a bishop washes a cup or leaves it unwashed is not a matter of the least consequence, it will get on very well.
27; Bell, Jews and Christians in Egypt: the Jewish Troubles in Alexandria and the Athanasian Controversy (London, 1924), 10-21.
Similarly, whereas he had rejected the Athanasian Creed as a young man and had finally found an avenue for its acceptance in Maurice's liberal interpretation of negative doctrines like eternal punishment, in 1865 he seems closer to a position of casuistry or mental reservation than to one of a via media:
Athanasian, "Surgical management for malignant tumors of the thumb," Hand, vol.
Despite his reverence for the BCP, Wesley was critical of some of its contents, and he stated his objections in a 1755 document: The Athanasian Creed and its "damnatory clauses," sponsors' answers in Baptism, Confirmation, absolution in Visiting the Sick, thanksgiving in the Burial Office, clauses that differentiate between bishops and presbyters, and the following sentence in the ordination of priests: "Whose soever sins ye remit, they are remitted.
The volume is filled out by a good bibliography, an index of Athanasian texts, a general index, and a two-page chronology of Athanasius's life.
Christ in me" communicates the principal metaphor of mystical theology-the Athanasian claim that "God became man so that man might become God" (cf.
143) Significantly, the commentaries on the Pauline epistles are the only selections from the Athanasian corpus that Zwingli annotates in the margins.
The greatest of these "war-songs of faith" according to Newman was the Athanasian creed, which simply gloried in repeating, in a "sublime formulary," the mysterious nature of Jesus Christ--perfectus Deus, perfectus homo.
Her Ministers indeed, I do not regard as infallible personages, I have seen too much of them for that--but to the Establishment, with all her faults--the profane Athanasian Creed excluded--I am sincerely attached" (Smith 1:581).