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arguing for the sake of arguing

 and arguing for the sake of argument
arguing simply to be difficult or contrary. You are just arguing for the sake ofarguing. You don't even know what the issue is. He is annoying, because he is always arguing for the sake of argument.
See also: argue, of, sake

get into an argument (with someone) (about someone or something)

 and get into an argument (with someone) (over someone or something)
to enter a quarrel with someone about someone or something. I don't want to get into an argument with you about Dan. Mary got into an argument about money with Fred. I really don't want to get into an argument.
See also: argument, get

have an argument (with someone)

to argue with someone. Let's not have an argument with the boss. Tom and John had an argument.
See also: argument, have

pick a quarrel

(with someone) Go to pick a fight (with someone).
See also: pick, quarrel

for the sake of argument

in order to consider the possibility Assume, for the sake of argument, that what she says is true.
See also: argument, of, sake


see under pick a quarrel.

pick a quarrel

Also, pick an argument or fight . Seek an opportunity to quarrel or argue with someone. For example, I don't want to pick a quarrel with you, or Jason was always in trouble for picking fights. These terms use pick in the sense of "select." [Mid-1400s]
See also: pick, quarrel
References in classic literature ?
But now, since the argument has thus far prevailed, the only question which remains to be considered is, whether we shall do rightly either in escaping or in suffering others to aid in our escape and paying them in money and thanks, or whether in reality we shall not do rightly; and if the latter, then death or any other calamity which may ensue on my remaining here must not be allowed to enter into the calculation.
It was a perfect answer to an argument which had seemed unanswerable.
And not enough for me to be unable to overwhelm you in argument.
All I say is that it is not argument that convinces me of the necessity of a future life, but this: when you go hand in hand with someone and all at once that person vanishes there, into nowhere, and you yourself are left facing that abyss, and look in.
He glanced at her, and ground out further steps in his argument, determined that no folly should remain when this experience was over.
As soon as Joan had taken her seat, an argument had sprung up on either side of Katharine, as to whether the Salvation Army has any right to play hymns at street corners on Sunday mornings, thereby making it impossible for James to have his sleep out, and tampering with the rights of individual liberty.
But the personal question between James and Johnnie merged into some argument already, apparently, debated, so that the parts had been distributed among the family, in which Ralph took the lead; and Katharine found herself opposed to him and the champion of Johnnie's cause, who, it appeared, always lost his head and got excited in argument with Ralph.
But at the most exciting stage of the argument, for no reason that Katharine could see, all chairs were pushed back, and one after another the Denham family got up and went out of the door, as if a bell had summoned them.
She was thinking of their argument, and when, after the long climb, he opened his door, she began at once.
Maston abusing the learned Belfast as usual, who was by his side; the secretary of the Gun Club maintaining for the thousandth time that he had just seen the projectile, and adding that he could see Michel Ardan's face looking through one of the scuttles, at the same time enforcing his argument by a series of gestures which his formidable hook rendered very unpleasant.
Morgenstern and others have asked whether the definition of justice, which is the professed aim, or the construction of the State is the principal argument of the work.
For the plan grows under the author's hand; new thoughts occur to him in the act of writing; he has not worked out the argument to the end before he begins.
I meant "there's a nice knock-down argument for you
But "glory" doesn't mean "a nice knock-down argument,"' Alice objected.
We have not the requisite data," chimed in the professor, and he went back to his argument.
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