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References in classic literature ?
And then there were apple pies, and peach pies, and pumpkin pies; besides slices of ham and smoked beef; and moreover delectable dishes of preserved plums, and peaches, and pears, and quinces; not to mention broiled shad and roasted chickens; together with bowls of milk and cream, all mingled higgledy- pigglely, pretty much as I have enumerated them, with the motherly teapot sending up its clouds of vapor from the midst-- Heaven bless the mark
In I got bodily into the apple barrel, and found there was scarce an apple left; but sitting down there in the dark, what with the sound of the waters and the rocking movement of the ship, I had either fallen asleep or was on the point of doing so when a heavy man sat down with rather a clash close by.
Meanwhile, the first cravings of his stomach having been stilled, Gringoire felt some false shame at perceiving that nothing remained but one apple.
That's nothing to be afraid of," he replied, throwing away the core of his apple and beginning to eat another one.
Have an apple," suggested the shaggy man, handing her one with pretty red cheeks.
And they, watching at the house, saw him fall, saw his body bounce when it struck the earth, and saw the burst of red-cheeked apples that rolled about him.
They can look at a tree in bloom and tell how many boxes of apples it will pack, and not only that--they'll know.
Why, those Dalmatians are showing Pajaro apples on the South African market right now, and coining money out of it hand over fist.
Tom's mouth watered for the apple, but he stuck to his work.
Place yourself at the window with your sisters; I will ride by and throw you the silver apple.
The look is quite lost on him: he eats his apple with a dreamy expression of happiness, as it is quite a good one.
And the botanist who finds that the apple falls because the cellular tissue decays and so forth is equally right with the child who stands under the tree and says the apple fell because he wanted to eat it and prayed for it.
You," he said to the First Poet, "excel in Art - take the Apple.
The white and green light strained through apple trees and clustering vines outside fell over the rapt little figure with a half-unearthly radiance.
As if a big round apple presented itself to my hand, a ripe golden apple, with a coolly-soft, velvety skin:--thus did the world present itself unto me:--