Appearance


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to all appearances

According to the way things appear or how one sees things; as is apparent to observation. To all appearances, Daren seemed a very happy, outgoing fellow, so his nervous breakdown took many people by surprise. The giant corporation was, to all appearances, doing quite well, but just last week it filed for bankruptcy.
See also: all, appearance

Appearances can be deceiving.

Prov. Things can look different from the way they really are. Edward seems like a very nice boy, but appearances can be deceiving. Jane may look like she doesn't understand you, but she's really extremely bright. Appearances can be deceiving.
See also: Appearance, can, deceive

by all appearances

apparently; according to what one sees or how things seem. She is, by all appearances, ready to resume work. By all appearances, we ought to be approaching the airport.
See also: all, appearance

keep someone up

 
1. Lit. to hold someone upright. Try to keep him up until I can get his bed made. Keep her up for a few minutes longer.
2. Fig. to prevent someone from going to bed or going to sleep. I'm sorry, was my trumpet keeping you up? The noise kept us up.
See also: keep, up

keep something up

 
1. Lit. to hold or prop something up. Keep your side of the trunk up. Don't let it sag. Keep up your side of the trunk.
2. Fig. to continue doing something. I love your singing. Don't stop. Keep it up. Please keep up your singing.
3. Fig. to maintain something in good order. I'm glad you keep the exterior of your house up. You keep up your house nicely.
See also: keep, up

keep up appearances

to make things look all right whether they are or not. We must keep up appearances even if it means little sacrifices here and there. Things may be unpleasant, but we will keep up appearances.
See also: appearance, keep, up

keep up

 (with someone or something)
1. Lit. to advance at the same rate as someone or something; to be just as productive as someone or something. Don't work so fast. I can't keep up with you. You're running so fast that I cannot keep up with you. I don't make enough money to keep up with your spending.
2. Fig. to pay attention to the news about someone or something. I don't see the Smiths a lot since they moved, but I keep up with them by phone. I try to keep up with current events.
See also: keep, up

make an appearance

to appear; to appear in a performance. We waited for thirty minutes for the professor to make an appearance, then we went home. The famous singing star made an appearance in Detroit last August.
See also: appearance, make

put in an appearance (at something)

to appear briefly at some place or at some event. I only wanted to put in an appearance at the reception, but I ended up staying for two hours. Do we have to stay a long time, or can we just put in an appearance?
See also: appearance, put

keep up (with somebody/something)

1. to stay level or equal with someone or something I'm too old or too tired and I just can't keep up. The little boy tried very hard to keep up with his older brother's accomplishments.
2. to move as quickly as someone else I have short legs, and I almost had to run to keep up.
See also: keep, up

keep somebody up

also keep up somebody
to cause someone to stay awake I hope I'm not keeping you up. You're making so much noise, you're going to keep up the whole neighborhood!
See also: keep, up

keep up something

also keep something up
to continue to do or have something Keep up the good work. Even though he lost his job, they managed to keep up an expensive lifestyle. I have a great relationship with my children now, and I'm doing my best to keep that up.
See also: keep, up

keep up appearances

to hide your personal or financial problems from other people by continuing to live and behave in the same way that you did in the past Simply keeping up appearances was stretching their resources to the limit.
See also: appearance, keep, up

keep up

1. Also, keep up with. Proceed at the same pace, continue alongside another, as in We try to keep up with the times. [First half of 1600s] This usage, also put as keep pace, appears in the phrase keeping up with the Joneses, which was coined in 1913 by cartoonist Arthur R. Momand for the title of a series in the New York Globe. It means "trying to match the lifestyle of one's more affluent neighbors or acquaintances." For example, Their buying a new van is just another attempt to keep up with the Joneses.
2. Support, sustain, as in They're trying to keep up their spirits while they wait for news of the crash. [Late 1600s] Also see keep one's chin up.
3. Maintain in good condition, as in Joan really kept up the property. [Mid-1500s] This usage also appears in the idiom keep up appearances, meaning "to maintain a good front, make things look good even if they're not," as in She was devastated by his bad prognosis but is trying hard to keep up appearances for their children . [Mid-1700s]
4. Persevere, carry on, prolong, as in Keep up the good work, or How long will this noise keep up? [Early 1500s] Also see keep it up.
5. Also, keep up with; keep up on. Stay in touch, remain informed. For example, Ann and I haven't seen each other since college, but we keep up through our annual Christmas letters , or We subscribe to three papers so as to keep up on current events. [c. 1900]
6. keep someone up. Cause someone to remain out of bed, as in He's keeping up the children beyond their bedtime. [Mid-1700s]
See also: keep, up

put in an appearance

Also, make an appearance. Be present, especially for a short time, as in We were hoping the rock star would put in an appearance, but she didn't show up, or She was tired and didn't want to go to the party, but decided she had to make an appearance. [Second half of 1600s]
See also: appearance, put

keep up

v.
1. To preserve or sustain something: We kept up the appearance of friendship even though we were mad at each other. The couple kept appearances up even though they had separated.
2. To maintain something in good condition: He did a good job of keeping up the property. The community kept up the old church.
3. To persevere in doing something; carry on doing something: I asked her to stop yelling, but she kept it up. Keep up the good work!
4. To continue at a steady level or pace, especially a significant level or pace: The snow kept up all day.
5. To maintain a value or level equal to that of something, even as that value or level increases: The number of new TVs that arrived didn't keep up with the demand. The scarcity of available land keeps up the demand for it.
6. To match some competitor or perceived competitor: I kept up with the leader of the race until the very end, and so I came in second place.
7. To cause someone to remain awake: The noise from the construction site kept me up all night.
8. keep up on To remain adequately informed: He loved to keep up on the gossip by reading the tabloids.
See also: keep, up

put in an appearance

To attend a social engagement, especially for a short time.
See also: appearance, put
References in classic literature ?
Fortunately, his monitress, though by no means of the purest water, knew better than to suffer her eleve to commit so gross a blunder, and I escaped the calamity of making my first appearance at court under the auspices of such a patron.
His head was carefully shaven with the exception of two circular spots, about the size of a dollar, near the,top of the cranium, where the hair, permitted to grow of an amazing length, was twisted up in two prominent knots, that gave him the appearance of being decorated with a pair of horns.
This was accomplished in a short time, and when the emperor returned his nickel-plated body shone so magnificently that the Scarecrow heartily congratulated him on his improved appearance.
Old Sharon, to all appearance, dropped the subject there.
She had never used it herself, but she had read of the practice of eating arsenic among the Styrian peasantry for the purpose of clearing the color, and of producing a general appearance of plumpness and good health.
In no part was there life, in no part was there an appearance of vegetation.
The secondary formations are more broken; but, as Bronn has remarked, neither the appearance nor disappearance of their many now extinct species has been simultaneous in each separate formation.
Judging from the appearance, and from similar cases in England, I supposed that the air was saturated with moisture.
And please, as Glaucon requested of you, to exclude reputations; for unless you take away from each of them his true reputation and add on the false, we shall say that you do not praise justice, but the appearance of it; we shall think that you are only exhorting us to keep injustice dark, and that you really agree with Thrasymachus in thinking that justice is another's good and the interest of the stronger, and that injustice is a man's own profit and interest, though injurious to the weaker.
Behind it lay a few desolate fields, and then the brown heath-clad summit of the hill; before it (enclosed by stone walls, and entered by an iron gate, with large balls of grey granite - similar to those which decorated the roof and gables - surmounting the gate-posts) was a garden, - once stocked with such hard plants and flowers as could best brook the soil and climate, and such trees and shrubs as could best endure the gardener's torturing shears, and most readily assume the shapes he chose to give them, - now, having been left so many years untilled and untrimmed, abandoned to the weeds and the grass, to the frost and the wind, the rain and the drought, it presented a very singular appearance indeed.
In which the author himself makes his appearance on the stage.
A photographic plate exposed on a clear night reproduces the appearance of the portion of the sky concerned, with more or fewer stars according to the power of the telescope that is being used.
A great fall of snow had taken place the night before, and the fields were of one uniform white; the appearance was disconsolate, and I found my feet chilled by the cold damp substance that covered the ground.
said the old man, a brief description of whose manner and appearance concluded the last chapter, 'aha
With more kisses, and hugs, and tears, than many young gentlemen who start upon their travels, and leave well-stocked homes behind them, would deem within the bounds of probability (if matter so low could be herein set down), Kit left the house at an early hour next morning, and set out to walk to Finchley; feeling a sufficient pride in his appearance to have warranted his excommunication from Little Bethel from that time forth, if he had ever been one of that mournful congregation.