an eye for an eye


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an eye for an eye

Compensation or retribution that is (or should be) equal to the injury or offense that was originally dealt. The saying comes from various passages in the Old Testament, including in Exodus, Leviticus, and Deuteronomy, and is sometimes expanded as "an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth." Some countries have laws that punish crimes with an eye for an eye, most often that killing someone will result in one's death.
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an eye for an eye

COMMON People say an eye for an eye to mean a system of justice in which the punishment for a crime is either the same as the crime or equivalent to it. They should bring back the death penalty for murder. An eye for an eye. Note: People sometimes use the full expression, an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth with the same meaning. If the world is ever to be free of pointless wars, we will all have to abandon the belief in the barbaric philosophy of an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth. Note: Variations of this expression occur several times in the Old Testament of the Bible: `Life shall go for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot.' (Deuteronomy 19:21)
See also: eye

an eye for an eye

Punishment in which an offender suffers what the victim has suffered.
See also: eye
References in periodicals archive ?
The vehement reaction to An Eye for an Eye stems in part from the fact that Sack and his publisher tossed this controversial book into an intellectual vacuum--an ignorance about this period and certainly about Jewish presence in this period--with no preface or anything else to set the context.
In An Eye for an Eye, he recounts a 1992 interview with Leszek Nasiadko, the thirtyseven-year-old Polish major heading up the Morel investigation for the Commission for the Investigation of Crimes Against the Polish Nation.