offer affordance(s)

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offer affordance(s)

To provide the means for something to happen or take place. Of course, man-made systems of organization in any field inherently offer affordances for error and exploitation, as the human element can neither be escaped nor denied. While many see the increasing amount of technology as a detriment to children's minds, one cannot underestimate how it also offers affordance to their increased capacity to learn and access information.
See also: offer
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather, the suspense builds, in part, through the manipulation of specific kinds of visual affordances.
This information contained affordances that when acted upon became cultural facts advancing pragmatic human developments.
Humanities researchers are very much aware of the affordances, advantages, and problems of various information technologies, but are concerned about accuracy and ease of use for both physical and electronic resources.
OL and F2F learning environments are "complex entities with multiple sets of affordances that are predicated on the perceptions of users and the context in which they are used" (Jonassen, Cambell, & Davidson, 1994, p.
In turn, cultural-societal structures provide affordances and constraints that shape the development of specific forms of consciousness.
The methodology for this study was supported by educational technology theorists (such as Neuman, 1989; Salomon, Perkins, & Globerson, 1991) who have advocated more naturalistic studies that provide appropriate data about relevant social and cognitive processes to explore the affordances of innovative technologies for learning.
These 12 factors are: affordance, cognitive offloading, constraints, distance, epistemic appropriateness, feedback, flexibility, flow, focus, involvement, scaffolding, and transition.
In addition to these positive findings, results about students' responses to sketch affordances, mathematical knowledge and skills, and ability to reason visually, led to a deeper understanding of: (a) the relationship between web-based activities and the development of geometric thinking skills, and (b) the relationship between the design of preconstructed sketches and the exploration process (Sinclair, 2003).
Diversity and availability of housing is thus one urban affordance.
Often in program design, the environment is scanned for potential risk management hazards, but through the lens of affordance, the environmental scan results in possibilities and potential for what the children can "do" in an experiential sense and creates a physical and psychological habitat (Barker & Wright, 1955).
In keeping with social affordance theory (Loveland, 1991), environments offer opportunities for perception and action to people in the context of their capacities, both physical and psychological.
The Affordance of Anchored Discussion for the Collaborative Processing of Academic texts, International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, 1(3), 339357.
The concept of affordance (see Gibson) refers to how people perceive the value and meaning of various entities as well as what physical qualities such entities have for their users.
Similar to all communicative modes, images have constraints and potentials for making meaning; the term modal affordance refers to what is "possible to express and represent easily with a mode" (Jewitt, 2009c, p.
The increase in the dollar value of incentives in the Patient Protection and Affordance Care Act (PPACA) and the recent PPACA regulations from 20 to 30 (and in some cases 50) percent of premium has opened the door to increased need for multiple outcomes-based strategies delivered in accordance with those laws.